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Taking good sound recordings?

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Taking good sound recordings?

Postby Knüppelrührer » Mon Sep 14, 2020 7:53 pm

Hello folks,

Next week I'll have the chance fly in a motorglider equipped with a Rotax 914.

Are there any tips and tricks for taking good sound recordings? Equipment is limited to camera microphone and cellphone, but better than nothing.

On the list:
starting inside / outside
different RPMs, different speeds during flying
canopy open/close
stick movements
switches
circuit breakers
fuel pump
not sure, if pure wind sounds possible
drop me a note, if you need something

Of course there are the obvious things like no talking, no motorcycle around and no rattling elements, but maybe there are other important items.

Is anybody familiar with post-production like deleting noise and producing usable soundloops, for example in Audacity?
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Re: Taking good sound recordings?

Postby Johan G » Mon Sep 14, 2020 8:33 pm

Knüppelrührer wrote in Mon Sep 14, 2020 7:53 pm:[...] a motorglider equipped with a Rotax 914.

Remember to document which motorglider.

A good tip from many audio related YouTube channels: Slating; Start and/or end each recording segment stating what you are/have been recording. I could have done that a few times more in the past. :wink:
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Re: Taking good sound recordings?

Postby Thorsten » Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:39 am

Basically it's (unfortunately) down to good equipment - integrated camera microphones (even from an expensive steadycam) are lousy devices.

To get even halfway good recordings, you need a good microphone and you need to constantly monitor the gain that you're not clipping the loud parts. The ambience needs to be (in comparison to what you're recording) silent or at least reasonably constant to be filtered away. Having a directional microphone helps a lot.

We've not managed to get useful recordings of anything out in nature until we actually started to work with a sound technician with field equipment, and the general principle is that - whether under studio-conditions or in the field - one person needs to handle sound equipment and not do anything else.

So don't be disappointed if the result isn't up to your expectations. :D
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Re: Taking good sound recordings?

Postby Johan G » Wed Sep 16, 2020 11:24 am

Pro equipment and techniques (something to drool over):


Edit: Fixed the second link.
Low-level flying — It's all fun and games till someone looses an engine. (Paraphrased from a YouTube video)
Improving the Dassault Mirage F1 (Wiki, Forum, GitLab. Work in slow progress)
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Re: Taking good sound recordings?

Postby Knüppelrührer » Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:30 pm

last link presumably https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK5N41bfSu8

Excellent guys! At least the gaff tape he mentions is present.

Clipping is an interesting aspect.
And of course organising start/end of recordings.
I'll try my best!

Aircraft is going to to a Samburo AV-68.
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Re: Taking good sound recordings?

Postby Johan G » Wed Sep 16, 2020 6:58 pm

Knüppelrührer wrote in Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:30 pm:last link presumably https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OK5N41bfSu8

Correct. Thanks. :)

Knüppelrührer wrote in Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:30 pm:At least the gaff tape he mentions is present.

Gaff tape seem to be the duct tape of audio engineers. :wink:

Used for bundling wires, fixing wires and microphones on structures and for hiding lavalier microphones on actors and protecting them from rustling. Etc, etc.

Knüppelrührer wrote in Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:30 pm:Aircraft is going to to a Samburo AV-68.

Looks a bit like a more modern Bergfalke SF-25.
Low-level flying — It's all fun and games till someone looses an engine. (Paraphrased from a YouTube video)
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